Innovation Index: This week in Creative Corridor startup news, July 18

Welcome to the Innovation Index! Each week, I’ll round up links and stories from around the web relating to startups, innovation and entrepreneurship in Iowa’s Creative Corridor and around the state. You can help! Email me news and notes.  Quotable: “Economic development officials often lift up past performance of incentive packages by measuring the growth and job creation…however, if the company was promising enough to be courted for relocation, it should come as little surprise that company grew.” This article from the Washington Post outlines how a commonly used economic development strategy – recruiting a business to move from out of state – may actually hurt the economy in the long run. Or, in other words, why #wecreatehere. News and notes: Dev/Iowa Bootcamp, a program from JPEC, hosted an open house to show off projects students have built for startups and nonprofits over the past few week. Josh McNary called it ‘Just what an entrepreneur needs.’ There will be one more open house, July 30. These are our future developers, Iowa tech community: Aaron Seegmiller and Clay Hollenback built a new website for Beat Cancer Today Greg Gholson worked on Blue Cheese Gigi Wood and Linda Oyolu worked on BornReady Maximilian Franze-Soeln built the web interface for his startup, GenerationFuse Troy McCarthy built a touch-screen game for kids at the Iowa City Public Library Brant Kapple worked with NextStep.io Denisse Rauda and Matt LaMarche built a web interface for Re-App (pictured) Robb Laake worked on SPEEKO In more UI-related news, the Jacobson Institute for Youth Entrepreneurship brought students and teachers alike to Iowa City for summer programs. Read more in this Gazette story. Check out the…
Eight teams emerge from 3 Day Startup Iowa City

Eight teams emerge from 3 Day Startup Iowa City

While most of their peers were preparing for finals or enjoying the spring weather, about 35 Iowan students spent the weekend building startups. 3 Day Startup (3DS) was started at the University of Texas at Austin, and has expanded to more than 55 universities worldwide. “The mantra is, ‘make something people want,'” said Maia Donohue, a program manager at 3DS, on the emphasis on customer discovery. “There’s a lot of pivoting, and a lot of learning that comes through that process.” The event is similar in format to Startup Weekend. Ideas are pitched on Friday night and teams form around the most popular. Customer discovery, business planning and development work happen all weekend before a final pitch Sunday night. That said, there are a few key differences between 3DS and Startup Weekend: 3DS is only open to students, who must apply to participate, where Startup Weekend is open to anyone Startup Weekend only allows new ideas, where some 3DS projects had already been in the works for months. Startup Weekend declares winners, where 3DS typically does not. Alexander noted that many JPEC events, including the numerous business model and pitch competitions that happen each year, are geared toward students who have already launched a business. 3DS gives students from different majors a chance to connect and explore the very beginnings of an idea. “We really tried to get out and spread the word to engineering, computer science and graphic design,” she said. Seven teams made it through the weekend: Alphabetically: Blue Cheese Pitched by: Ruihao Min Blue Cheese is an app that translates menu items between Chinese and English. Min, who came...