This weeks #Urbanist Goodreads have the motor revving

This weeks #Urbanist Goodreads have the motor revving

I love cars. This might be surprising considering I have kind of made it my life’s mission to make American cities less beholden to the automobile. Still, cars are awesome. The chortle of exhaust on a ludicrously powerful muscle car is operatic. The rush of discovering a twisty rural road is something that makes me grin like a child. I grew up in a family that liked cars. My dad kept his SCCA trophies on his desk while we were growing up. I have an uncle who – god bless him – can’t help but replace whatever shiny, sleek, rocket he bought with a newer, faster, shinier, sleeker, rocket every few years. Then he gives the entire family a ride one by one. The problem with the car arises once you move from a backroad and shunt it into an urban area. We have spent the last seventy years reconfiguring our cities to work better for cars than for people. This perverse order has fundamentally reshaped our built places and our lives to depend on the car. The more we depend on the car, the more we build places that depend on the car, the more we make our places less economically and socially resilient. The environment that is great for a car is really awful for people. How did we get to this point? Murder Machines: Why Cars Will Kill 30,000 Americans This Year – Collector’s Weekly For those of us who grew up with cars, it’s difficult to conceptualize American streets before automobiles were everywhere. “Imagine a busy corridor in an airport, or a crowded city park, where everybody’s…