#Urbanist goodreads, including The Hannah Horvath theory of interstate commerce.

This week we explore a dying mall in Dallas; learn why transportation spending in New York is a good thing for Iowa City; take a ride on Denver’s expanding light rail system; make the case that small towns and cities need to urbanize just as much as big cities; see how lack of transit affects public housing residents out in St. Louis sprawl; and meet the artists transforming a building in a blighted neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio. The Twilight of the Indoor Mall – The Awl Here’s what happens when a mall like Collin Creek Mall dies. After its first major anchor pulls out, stores around it continue to close, slowly but persistently, one at a time, year after year. The remaining stores rearrange, consolidate space, move closer to the entrances. The mall becomes depressing, yes, but it’s still viable. Eventually, though, another anchor decides to pull out. Maybe it’s Macy’s. Maybe it’s JC Penny. Another cavity forms, another dead zone. Foot traffic gets ligher. Management doesn’t tell anybody anything about the future of the mall, because management won’t tell anybody anything until the day they decide to close the mall for good. Stores hear rumors from other stores. Basic upkeep starts to slip. The floors get dirty. The plants die. The mall starts to smell. When two anchors leave, “that’s typically the beginning of the downward spiral leading to ultimate extinction,” Cedric Lanchance, director at a real estate analytics firm, said in a Business Insider article. Collin Creek Mall in Plano, Texas is dying. Dillard’s has left. Stores are closing left and right. What’s happening at Collin Creek is…