This weeks #Urbanist Goodreads are all about suburban poverty

This week we take a look at the rise of suburban poverty. In the 2000s the number of people living in poverty in the suburb surpassed the number of poor in cities. Suburbs have specific challenges to fighting poverty. It’s hard to create a fiscally sound, comprehensive transit system in the midst of sprawl. Many suburbs were built essentially all at once, meaning that infrastructure and building stock are falling apart at the same time and there isn’t enough money to fix it. Social services designed to help the poor are concentrated in cities, meaning that suburban poor don’t have access to a robust social safety net. Infographic: What’s Driving the Rapid Rise of Poverty in the Suburbs? – Confronting Suburban Poverty in America The numbers behind the increase in suburban poor. There’s been a 64% rise in the number of suburban poor since 2000. Injustice at the Intersection – Dissent “When created in the middle years of the last century, these were places for middle-class white homeowners to get away from urban poverty. Their builders envisioned an endless future of affluent isolation. Circumstances have changed, but landscape and governance endure, bequeathing a legacy of institutionalized injustice to today’s residents.” The Complications for our Deteriorating Inner-Ring Suburbs – Belt “The problem is that in some of these suburbs all the housing was built at once, and it is all getting old and unsaleable at the same time — and no new housing is being built to take its place.” Suburbs and the New American Poverty – The Atlantic “The problem speaks to a different kind of erosion of the American Dream,…