This weeks #urbanist goodreads aren’t about urbanism

Have you checked out the urbanism blogroll yet? It’s a collection of my favorite places to keep up with what’s happening in urbanism and urban planning all over the country and the planet. Not all of the sites on that list are dedicated purely to urbanism issues though, so this week I thought I would bring you a collection of some of my favorites from these sites that aren’t about urban planning. Everything I thought I knew about water in California is wrong – Grist “Assumptions are useful things — they provide a foundation for understanding the world. The more I read and talked to experts, the less of that foundation I had left, and I found myself asking the most basic question: What is water for?” Nathaneal Johnson wanted to write a simple article about things California could do to mitigate the effects of their historic drought. He discovered that there’s nothing simple about how water gets used. Out of the Ashes – Aeon “So, would a society starting over on a planet stripped of its fossil fuel deposits have the chance to progress through its own Industrial Revolution? Or to phrase it another way, what might have happened if, for whatever reason, the Earth had never acquired its extensive underground deposits of coal and oil in the first place? Would our progress necessarily have halted in the 18th century, in a pre-industrial state?” Could we have built the modern world without carbon? Ferguson’s Fortune 500 Company – The Atlantic “Ferguson dramatizes James Baldwin’s observation that it is extremely expensive to be poor. The Department of Justice traced all…
This weeks urbanist goodreads are about rewilding

This weeks urbanist goodreads are about rewilding

Human beings have so altered the environment of our planet that there’s even a name for it; the anthropocene. What happens after people leave though? This weeks urbanist goodreads explore that question and ask how far we should go to fix our past mistakes. The Nuclear Tourist - National Geographic “In 2011, Chernobyl, site of the world’s worst catastrophe at a nuclear power plant, was officially declared a tourist attraction.   Nuclear tourism. Coming around the time of the Fukushima disaster, the idea seems absurd. And that is what drew me, along with the wonder of seeing towns and a whole city—almost 50,000 people lived in Pripyat—that had been abandoned in a rush, left to the devices of nature.” Is Chernobyl a Wild Kingdom, or a Radioactive Den of Decay? - Wired “About a decade ago, the animal sightings began. Naturalists started to report signs of an apparently remarkable recovery in the ecology of the quarantined territory. They photographed the tracks of a brown bear and saw wolves and boar roaming the streets of the abandoned town of Pripyat. In 2002, a young eagle owl—one of only 100 thought to be living in all of Ukraine at the time—was seen dozing on an abandoned excavator near the sarcophagus. The following year, an endangered white-tailed eagle was captured and radio-tagged within 3 miles of the plant. By early 2005, a herd of 21 rare Przewalski’s horses that had escaped from captivity in the quarantined area six years earlier had bred successfully and expanded to 64. It seemed the disaster that had banished industry, agriculture, pesticides, cars, and hunting from Chernobyl...